Pinterest and SEO – Not as Helpful as You Think?

Pinterest is one of the most recent social media successes and it has provided some real marketing value to (some!) organisations. That said there is also a lot of hype surrounding Pinterest that can be misleading, especially when it comes to search engine optimisation.

Let's take a closer look at Pinterest and how it fits into SEO and marketing strategies.

Pinterest and SEO – The Myth

If you know some basics about SEO you may have heard about the importance of inbound links. Links from external websites are one of the many factors that search engines like Google take into consideration when ranking a site, and some think it is one of the greatest factors used by Google. If your website gets many inbound links from reputable sources, Google will think that your website is also a respected source of information and this will factor this information into your website ranking. In other words, if the source of the link is someone with authority, it will pass some of their ranking “juice” to your website by linking to it. As they say on SEO Moz, an external link is like a “third-party vote” for your website.

A social media network like Pinterest or Twitter may seem like the perfect way to earn inbound links and improve your organic SEO strategy. After all, if one of your products or images or blog posts gets a ton of “pins” on Pinterest, that is a whole bunch of links pointing from a well-known website to your site, right?

Well…yes! But these are nofollow links. That means that the Google search robots do not read these inbound links or follow them (for the most part – read the full details about what Bing, Yahoo and Google think of nofollow links in this SEO Moz guide).

Nofollow links do NOT harm your rankings, they just don’t add the SEO value that some would lead you to believe.

We don’t want to dismiss Pinterest entirely. Though Pinterest links may not help your SEO directly, they present an obvious marketing opportunity. Instead of thinking of Pinterest as an easy SEO machine, think about how you can engage potential customers and current customers on this social network.

5 Tips for Using Pinterest in your Web Strategy

1. Add relevant keywords to your Pinterest description and pins so relevant users will find you.

2. Create link-building personas using information from Pinterest.

3. Look at your Pinterest traffic and see how useful it really is; are users just coming to your website and leaving right away? Measure!

4. Experiment with landing pages from Pinterest traffic to engage new users

5. Add your website to your profile description – this will not be a nofollow link!

I don’t think Pinterest should be a part of many social media strategies; many organisations would find bigger benefits from putting time and resources on other social networks, but for the right organisation it can be very beneficial. Read our post from Campbell Wilson for more on how, for some businesses, Pinterest Will Not Help Your Website.



Author: Sam

Alltop RSS


Pinterest and SEO – Not as Helpful as You Think?

Pinterest is one of the most recent social media successes and it has provided some real marketing value to (some!) organisations. That said there is also a lot of hype surrounding Pinterest that can be misleading, especially when it comes to search engine optimisation.

Let's take a closer look at Pinterest and how it fits into SEO and marketing strategies.

Pinterest and SEO – The Myth

If you know some basics about SEO you may have heard about the importance of inbound links. Links from external websites are one of the many factors that search engines like Google take into consideration when ranking a site, and some think it is one of the greatest factors used by Google. If your website gets many inbound links from reputable sources, Google will think that your website is also a respected source of information and this will factor this information into your website ranking. In other words, if the source of the link is someone with authority, it will pass some of their ranking “juice” to your website by linking to it. As they say on SEO Moz, an external link is like a “third-party vote” for your website.

A social media network like Pinterest or Twitter may seem like the perfect way to earn inbound links and improve your organic SEO strategy. After all, if one of your products or images or blog posts gets a ton of “pins” on Pinterest, that is a whole bunch of links pointing from a well-known website to your site, right?

Well…yes! But these are nofollow links. That means that the Google search robots do not read these inbound links or follow them (for the most part – read the full details about what Bing, Yahoo and Google think of nofollow links in this SEO Moz guide).

Nofollow links do NOT harm your rankings, they just don’t add the SEO value that some would lead you to believe.

We don’t want to dismiss Pinterest entirely. Though Pinterest links may not help your SEO directly, they present an obvious marketing opportunity. Instead of thinking of Pinterest as an easy SEO machine, think about how you can engage potential customers and current customers on this social network.

5 Tips for Using Pinterest in your Web Strategy

1. Add relevant keywords to your Pinterest description and pins so relevant users will find you.

2. Create link-building personas using information from Pinterest.

3. Look at your Pinterest traffic and see how useful it really is; are users just coming to your website and leaving right away? Measure!

4. Experiment with landing pages from Pinterest traffic to engage new users

5. Add your website to your profile description – this will not be a nofollow link!

I don’t think Pinterest should be a part of many social media strategies; many organisations would find bigger benefits from putting time and resources on other social networks, but for the right organisation it can be very beneficial. Read our post from Campbell Wilson for more on how, for some businesses, Pinterest Will Not Help Your Website.



Author: Sam

Alltop RSS